Understanding Multi-tenancy


I’m doing a lot of research and practical ‘playing’ with the Cordys BOP 4 environment at the moment.  It’s a relatively young product from a young company (founded in 2001) but from what I have understood about the product and its architecture it is a strong, versatile collaborative tool that really supports rapid application development and maintenance for business change thus reducing general cost of ownership.  I don’t want to talk about the product itself, I will be doing that soon enough, but I wanted to cover one of the software’s best features in my opinion and that is its ability to operate within the enterprise and in the cloud utilizing a fully multi-tenant architecture.

Multi-tenancy is an architectural principle which says that a single install of a software program / server application can service multiple client ‘organizations’, providing a customized isolated application environment with its own data.  This is in complete contrast to the idea of multiple instances for each organization (i.e. installing an instance of some server software and underlying database to serve one organization and store only that organizations data).  Each ‘organization’ (in the general sense of the word) is classed as a tenant, using the application, therefore if one single installed application can serve multiple tenants their customized view of the application, then it is said to have multi-tenancy (supports multiple tenants). Google apps is a perfect example of a multi-tenant architecture.  Multi-tenancy is the foundation architecture for most if not all Software as a Service applications, thus cloud applications support multi-tenancy.

How multi-tenancy is implemented in an application can vary from application to application.  The general principle however is to have the application virtually partition portions of its data and services to different consuming organizations.  A very simple example at the data level would be to have the application generate a set of related data tables under new database schemas as new organizations are set-up to use the application (so a schema per organization).  This separates off the data into logical groups that have their own security context on the database.  There are other ways to partition the data, but this is just to illustrate one potential method.

So multi-tenancy is a software architecture and one that is prevalent in cloud applications.  Cordys BOP 4 does this very well and I’m looking forward to investigating this product and its virtualization capabilities further.

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